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Job Creation

From research labs and supplier factories to assembly lines and dealership showrooms, the auto industry supports nearly 8 million jobs, pays $500 billion in annual compensation and generates $70 billion in personal tax revenue in the United States.

And, as low-skill manufacturing has shifted overseas (for example, in textiles or some consumer electronics), the importance of high-skill manufacturing, like automobiles, has risen. With auto sales rebounding from the financial crisis of the 2008 – 2009, automakers’ importance to our economy will continue to grow. Industry experts predict Chrysler, Ford and GM could hire 34,000 new workers over the next four years. And those new jobs will support about 300,000 more new jobs at auto suppliers and other local businesses that serve Chrysler, Ford and GM plants.

Chrysler, Ford and GM are just three of 16 major global automakers competing in the U.S., but they employ two-thirds of America’s autoworkers, purchase nearly two-thirds of the auto parts manufactured here, produce 55 percent of the autos assembled here and conduct most of America’s auto research and development.

Why do Chrylser, Ford and GM contribute so much more to our economy? Because they conduct the bulk of their engineering, manufacturing, marketing and finance work here. Four out of 10 Chrysler, Ford and GM employees are based in the U.S. At Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Hyundai/Kia, BMW, Mercedes and VW (the seven largest foreign automakers), only five in 100 employees are based here. That eight-fold difference translates into millions of U.S. jobs and tens of billions of dollars in parts sales, R&D and capital investment each year.

Jul 28 2014
Written by Melissa Burden | Posted on Detroit News

General Motors Co.’s Chevrolet brand is providing 12 plug-in hybrid Chevrolet Volts to the nonprofit MBAs Across America program, which is traveling the country to help small businesses.

The automaker held a celebratory event Friday at its Renaissance Center headquarters. GM CEO Mary Barra and Detroit Deputy Mayor Ike McKinnon welcomed the students who spent the week in Detroit working with seven local businesses.

Jul 21 2014
Written by David Skolnick | Posted on Vindy.com

After his first visit to the General Motors Lordstown complex, U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, co-chairman of the Senate Auto Caucus, called it “a really inspiring experience.”

The Republican senator said Friday that he was impressed with the Chevrolet Cruze being built at the facility and the workers.

Lordstown “is producing a world-class car in a world-class production facility,” he said about the Cruze.

Jul 17 2014
Written by Mitsuru Obe | Posted on Wall Street Journal

With an ultimate goal of stimulating economic growth, hopes are high that the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade agreement will lead to a spike in cross-border business deals among member countries. Assuming that’s the case, Japan’s chief TPP negotiator posed an interesting question: why does the pact sidestep a key factor that affects practically all international business activity?

Jul 14 2014
Written by Nicole Weddington | Posted on M Live

FLINT, MI — Whether it's contributing money, paying employees while they stand on street corners selling newspapers or aiding in administrative duties, General Motors has been the backbone of Old Newsboys since its inception.

It all began in 1924 with a couple of men with big hearts.

Taking his cue from The Old Newsboys/Good Fellows of Detroit, the superintendent of Flint's Buick Body Plant, O.W. Young, known to his friends as Youngie, saw a need for a similar program in Flint.

Jul 11 2014
Written by Michael Martinez | Posted on Detroit News

Ford Motor Co. said Thursday it’s creating a $1 million scholarship fund to honor recently-retired CEO Alan Mulally.

The Alan Mulally Leadership in Engineering Scholarship will honor automotive engineering students from universities around the world starting in the spring of 2015. Each year for 10 years, the scholarship will offer 10 students $10,000 one-time scholarships.
 

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