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Job Creation

From research labs and supplier factories to assembly lines and dealership showrooms, the auto industry supports nearly 8 million jobs, pays $500 billion in annual compensation and generates $70 billion in personal tax revenue in the United States.

And, as low-skill manufacturing has shifted overseas (for example, in textiles or some consumer electronics), the importance of high-skill manufacturing, like automobiles, has risen. With auto sales rebounding from the financial crisis of the 2008 – 2009, automakers’ importance to our economy will continue to grow. Industry experts predict Chrysler, Ford and GM could hire 34,000 new workers over the next four years. And those new jobs will support about 300,000 more new jobs at auto suppliers and other local businesses that serve Chrysler, Ford and GM plants.

Chrysler, Ford and GM are just three of 16 major global automakers competing in the U.S., but they employ two-thirds of America’s autoworkers, purchase nearly two-thirds of the auto parts manufactured here, produce 55 percent of the autos assembled here and conduct most of America’s auto research and development.

Why do Chrylser, Ford and GM contribute so much more to our economy? Because they conduct the bulk of their engineering, manufacturing, marketing and finance work here. Four out of 10 Chrysler, Ford and GM employees are based in the U.S. At Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Hyundai/Kia, BMW, Mercedes and VW (the seven largest foreign automakers), only five in 100 employees are based here. That eight-fold difference translates into millions of U.S. jobs and tens of billions of dollars in parts sales, R&D and capital investment each year.

Feb 07 2014
Written by Melissa Burden | Posted on The Detroit News

General Motors Co.’s new CEO Mary Barra was named Thursday as the Most Powerful Woman in Business in a global ranking by Fortune magazine.

Barra, who took over as CEO on Jan. 15 this year after heading global product development, purchasing and supply chain functions for the Detroit automaker, ranked No. 1 in the magazine’s new list of the top 50 most powerful business women across the globe.

Filed Under: Job Creation
Feb 06 2014
Written by Edward A. Sanchez | Posted on Truck Trend

Chrysler as a whole has had a healthy 2013, and a large part of the company's success can be directly attributed to its Ram truck brand. Sales of the Ram pickups have shown a double-digit year over year increase almost every month of the year in 2013, and demand is so strong for the trucks, that the prospect of a third truck plant is reportedly being considered, according to Automotive News.

Feb 05 2014
Written by Vince Bond Jr. | Posted on Automotive News

Ford Motor Co., with demand for its Super Duty pickups on the rise, plans to boost production capacity of the trucks 15 percent at its Kentucky Truck plant in Louisville.

When completed, the $80 million expansion will enable Ford to produce an additional 55,000 units a year, the company said.

The plant builds the Ford F-250, F-350, F-450 and F-550 Super Duty pickups, along with the Ford Expedition and Lincoln Navigator SUVs.

Feb 04 2014
Written by KTVI | Posted on Fox 2 Now

The General Motors plant in Wentzville is hiring. The chairman of the United Auto Workers Union says the plant is hiring between 35 to 50 workers a week and it will continue to over the next few months.

 

Jan 31 2014
Written by James R. Healey | Posted on USA Today

Ford Motor says it's investing $80 million and adding 350 jobs at its Kentucky Truck Plant in Louisville, to boost production of F-series Super Duty models about 15%, or 55,000 trucks a year.

Super Duty is Ford's name for F-250 and F-350 truck models, sometimes known as three-quarter-ton and one-ton models, and the even heavier-duty F-450 and F-550. Super Duty trucks almost always are sold as work trucks, albeit often well-appointed -- thus high-profit -- models.

Ford says demand for Super Duties is rising as the economy recovers.

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