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Environmental Stewardship

FCA US, Ford and General Motors Work to Reduce Their
Environmental Footprint

FCA US, Ford and General Motors are taking a comprehensive, all-inclusive approach to “going green”. Combining innovation, engineering and ingenuity, the U.S. automakers have implemented environmentally friendly measures from the start of production, to the final sale of the vehicle.

Not only have the automakers designed eco-friendly, fuel-efficient vehicles, but they have also implemented factory-standards to further minimize their total environmental footprint. From reducing energy consumption and water usage, to recycling vehicle manufacturing waste, to building eco-friendly facilities, FCA US, Ford and General Motors are working to be responsible stewards of the environment.

To name just a few examples, General Motors is repurposing used wood pallets into wood beams for the homebuilding industry. Further, General Motors has transformed the grounds of their Grand Blanc, Michigan Customer Care and Aftersales Headquarters into a wildlife habitat, certified by the Wildlife Habitat Council. In constructing the habitat, they used recycled materials such as Chevrolet Volt battery covers, converted into duck nesting boxes.

Ford has aimed to reduce their footprint by extensively using recycled materials in their vehicle production. The seat fabric on the Ford Fusion is made from recycled water bottles, and post-consumer recycled nylon is used in vehicle components, such as engine fans, HVAC temperature valves, engine covers, cam covers and carbon canisters. Ford also uses soy oil in the production of the seat foam for all of the company’s North American vehicles.

FCA US has made extensive corporate efforts to encourage its dealer-network to put in place high environmental standards for their facilities. The company has established a new Dealer ECO (Environmentally Conscious Operations) Program, to recognize dealers that demonstrate eco-friendly practices. Among other implementations, some dealerships have installed extensive solar-panel systems and rainwater collection systems, to lower their overall environmental footprint.

The American Auto Industry is doing its part to innovate and reliably and dependably “go green.”

 

Jun 16 2014
Written by James R. Healey | Posted on USA Today

The auto universe has shifted from four- and five-speed automatics to eight-speed gearboxes with remarkable speed.

Six-speed automatics, though still widespread, barely had time to claim status as exotic gearboxes before they were leafrogged..

Chrysler Group pioneered the eight-speed transmission in mainstream models, beginning with the 2012 Dodge Charger and Chrysler 300.

Jun 13 2014
Written by Sam Mceachern | Posted on GM Authority

With electric vehicle popularity on the rise, more and more employers are offering EV charging stations in their parking lots. General Motors is among them with 401 electric vehicle charging stations located at its numerous facilities all over the world, 20 percent of which are powered using solar energy.

Jun 11 2014
Written by Alisa Priddle | Posted on Detroit Free Press

Ford and Heinz have a juicy idea: They are exploring using tomato fibers for car parts.

The corporate giants are collaborating on replacing petrochemicals in plastic parts with sustainable materials made of tomato fibers. They are testing the fibers’ durability for use in vehicle wiring brackets and storage bins.

The bio-friendly composite uses dried tomato skins.

Jun 06 2014
Written by Clifford Atlyeh | Posted on Car and Driver

You’re looking at a Ford Fusion that’s been modified using so many exotic lightweight materials that it tips the scales at just 2635 pounds, or about as much as Ford’s subcompact Fiesta hatch. (The last production Fusion we weighed rang in at at 3474 pounds.) A curb weight of less than 2700 pounds is unheard of in this vehicle class, and we haven’t seen a sub-3000-pound mid-size Ford sedan since the first-gen Taurus in 1986.

Jun 05 2014
Written by Katherine Long | Posted on Seattle Times

Seattle — On the outside, it’s a basic, affordable, midsize Chevy Malibu.

But on the inside it’s a hybrid like no other, with two separate engines — one biodiesel, the other electric — that together give it the muscle of, well, a muscle car, not the faint and tentative speed of some hybrids.

For the last three years, a team of University of Washington students has designed, planned, tested, rebuilt, rewired and re-engineered the innards of the General Motors car.