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International Trade

Chrysler, Ford and GM have supported every major trade agreement negotiation to establish a 21st Century Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade agreement with Australia, Brunei, Chile, New Zealand, Malaysia, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam. AAPC also works to support U.S. trade relationships with other countries around the globe.

The Trans Pacific Partnership

The TPP will also provide a high standard free trade agreement model for the Asia-Pacific region, and a solid economic anchor for the United States in Asia to prevent an economic and trade divide in the middle of the Pacific region.

International Trade, and the TPP, will allow the U.S. to build on existing free trade agreements with four of the eight other countries (Australia, Chile, Peru, Singapore) by better coordinating and harmonizing gains already made in prior trade agreements with those nations. The TPP will serve as a substantial step forward by establishing free trade agreements with four new U.S. trade partners (Brunei, Malaysia, New Zealand and Vietnam). Finally, the agreement will allow the nine signatories to establish a model agreement capable of serving as a high-standard, broad-based regional pact.

Aug 11 2014
Written by Matt Blunt | Posted on AL.com

American businesses could be hiring more workers today if we ended unfair trade practices used by some of our trading partners. No matter how competitive companies are in Alabama, they struggle to keep up with foreign competitors that are given an unearned advantage because of currency manipulation.

Aug 04 2014
Written by Matt Blunt | Posted on The Wilson Center

In an ever-shrinking world, a popular refrain among some skeptics is that American manufacturing is not competitive in the global economy. A new report by the American Automotive Policy Council (AAPC) reveals that is simply not the case. Led by Chrysler, Ford and General Motors, American manufacturing is on the rise, creating jobs and expanding opportunity at a rate that hasn’t been seen in years.

Jul 17 2014
Written by Mitsuru Obe | Posted on Wall Street Journal

With an ultimate goal of stimulating economic growth, hopes are high that the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade agreement will lead to a spike in cross-border business deals among member countries. Assuming that’s the case, Japan’s chief TPP negotiator posed an interesting question: why does the pact sidestep a key factor that affects practically all international business activity?

Jul 07 2014
Written by Vicki Needham | Posted on The Hill

More than a dozen leading manufacturing groups on Thursday called on the Obama administration to include currency manipulation provisions in all future trade agreements, especially the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

The 13 groups, including the American Automotive Policy Council (AAPC), sent a letter to Treasury Secretary Jack Lew and U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman, as TPP talks begin in Ottawa.