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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $143 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts.
The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development.
Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. General Motors and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $706 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $104 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


Aug 10 2015
Written by Charles Fleming | Posted on Providence Journal

 

Chevrolet has announced that the second generation of its plug-in electric hybrid sedan can travel 53 miles on electric power before its gas-powered engine kicks in.

Consumers will be able to squeeze more juice out of the 2016 Volt.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Aug 07 2015
Written by Steven Ewing | Posted on Auto Blog

Good news, everyone! The Ford F-150 fullsize pickup truck is getting a new sport mode for 2016. Because it needs it, or something.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Aug 07 2015
Written by Michael Wayland | Posted on The Detroit News

Auburn Hills — Dodge will unleash Hellcat-mania on the 2015 Woodward Dream Cruise next week with thrill rides and a chance for one racer to take home a 707-horsepower Hellcat engine.

The mainstream performance brand has events scheduled from next Wednesday through Saturday along Woodward, but an opening event in Pontiac and grand finale in Royal Oak will likely be turning the most heads.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Aug 06 2015
Written by Becca Smouse and Alisa Priddle | Posted on USA Today

General Motors' redesigned Chevrolet Volt model gets 53 miles of driving range on its battery pack before using any gasoline, a nearly 40% increase from the previous model's 38-mile range.

The second-generation Volt uses an 18.4-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack to travel on battery power first before a gasoline generator kicks in.

The Environmental Protection Administration has certified the range for the 2016 Volt.

Aug 05 2015
Written by Kyle Stock | Posted on The Detroit News

Ford appears to have finally found the right gear with its F-150 pickup, otherwise known as the moneymaker.

After sales of the vehicle slipped every month from February through June, drivers snapped up 66,300 in July, 11,100 more than in June and a 4.8 percent increase over July 2014.

The company had struggled to roll out a thoroughly redesigned truck that incorporated far more aluminum than ever before in a bid to get better mileage. In the 12 months ending in June, Ford’s share of the pickup market declined from 33 percent to 28 percent.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy