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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $74 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $20 billion. Raw Materials and Parts. The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials. American Research & Development. Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. GM and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Amgen and Google – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $712 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $108 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Apple and Hewlett-Packard– and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


Jul 21 2015
Written by Edward A. Sanchez | Posted on Truck Trend

Over the last 20 years, fullsize trucks have grown to be bigger than ever, and their styling has, at least visually, become more and more chiseled and angular. It would seem this trend toward bigger, blockier styling would give these modern beasts of burden the aerodynamics of the proverbial barn door. However, thanks to computer-aided design and extensive wind tunnel testing, today’s trucks are slicker than ever cutting through the air.

Jul 20 2015
FCA US Media

The FCA Foundation, the charitable arm of FCA US LLC, today awarded grants totaling more than $62,000 to 17 Kokomo and Tipton-area community organizations and programs that serve youth development & education, senior citizens, veterans and multicultural activities. The announcement came during a gathering of 40 community leaders at the Indiana Transmission Plant I in Kokomo.
   

Jul 20 2015
Written by Mike Colias | Posted on Automotive News

General Motors plans to add a new Chevy crossover that will be slotted above the compact Equinox and below the full-size Traverse, according to three people familiar with the plan.
The move underscores how mainstream brands are following the lead of luxury marques by finding inventive ways to fit more flavors of crossovers into their showrooms.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jul 20 2015
Ford Media

Since 2003, Ford has reduced the injury rate by 70 percent for its more than 50,000 “industrial athletes” in the U.S., and many more around the world, through new ergonomics technology, lift-assist devices, workstation redesign and data-driven process changes.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jul 17 2015
GM News

The 2015 MLB All-Star Game Most Valuable Player, Mike Trout, chose a Silverado Midnight Edition during the MVP award ceremony presented by Chevrolet at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati on Tuesday night.

Chevrolet gave Trout, who hit a home run on the fourth pitch of the game and scored another run in the American League’s 6-3 victory, his choice between the sixth-generation Camaro Convertible and a Silverado Midnight Edition.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy