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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $143 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts.
The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development.
Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. General Motors and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $706 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $104 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


Feb 18 2016
Written by Jason Harper | Posted on Road & Track

Yes, I want a Jeep Wrangler truck. Me and most of the rest of the Internet, it turns out, as both Jeep and truck lovers went a little bonkers when the news broke last month that a truckified Jeep would join the next-generation Wrangler. Along with a potential diesel and hybrid version, the Wrangler Truck is supposed to go into production by late 2017.

The biggest question is simply what took them so long? Because, our truck choices kind of suck.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Feb 18 2016
Written by Michael Martinez | Posted on The Detroit News

General Motors Co.’s Chevrolet brand has launched an unconventional ad campaign for its 2016 Malibu and Cruze.

The brand tapped Michigan filmmaker Sam Raimi to direct a 60-second trailer that will be played in movie theaters nationwide for the next six months. The trailer has a horror-film vibe as a female character goes to open a door in a presumably haunted house before a voice tells her to stop and leave, followed by a narrator asking “Wouldn’t it be nice to have a warning before bad things happen?”

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Feb 18 2016
Written by Michael Martinez | Posted on The Detroit News

Tuesday snowstorm in Rochester, New York, dumped dozens of inches of snow onto the Interstate 490 expressway, sending cars spinning and tractor trailers into ditches.

But the rough winter weather wasn’t enough to stop a Ford Super Duty.

Reporter Cristina Domingues and her camera crew at Time Warner Cable News in Rochester captured video of Chris Johnson, a welder from nearby Byron, pulling a stranded big rig in what appeared to be a 2003 model year F-Series Super Duty King Ranch with a two-tone paint job.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Feb 16 2016
Written by Rick Popely | Posted on Chicago Tribune

Ford Motor Co. will add four new SUVs to its global lineup by 2020 to serve what it sees as a dramatic and ongoing shift away from passenger cars.

Mark LaNeve, Ford's vice president of sales and marketing, announced the plans Thursday at the Chicago Auto Show. LaNeve said SUV sales have nearly doubled in the U.S. since 2010, and the growth is driven by consumer preference, not by low gas prices.

Feb 16 2016
Written by Justin Cupler | Posted on InsideCarNews

If you grew up in my era, you are quite aware of the Power Wagon from Dodge. Well, the Dodge Ram may be dead, but the Power Wagon is still very much a part of the Ram brand, and it continues into 2017 with a refreshed look paired with the off-road capabilities we expect.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy