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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $143 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts.
The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development.
Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. General Motors and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $706 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $104 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


May 18 2015
Ford Media Center

For the second straight year, Ford Fiesta has been named to kbb.com’s list of its 10 Coolest Cars Under $18,000. Two criteria – being fun to drive and fun to own – are critical to what the editors say is a very subjective “cool factor,” the No. 1 attribute a vehicle must have to make the list. The 2015 Ford Fiesta continues to run at the head of the small-car pack with style, personality and a dazzling array of features and technologies that prove small is smart. Click here for more on the kbb.com award.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
May 18 2015
Chrysler Media Group

Following up on his title win at the NHRA Spring Nationals in Houston three weeks ago, Don Schumacher Racing (DSR) pilot Ron Capps drove his new 2015 Dodge Charger R/T to a runner-up finish at this weekend’s NHRA Southern Nationals at Atlanta Dragway.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
May 15 2015
Written by Greg Gardner | Posted on Detroit Free Press

General Motors will invest $1 billion in its Warren Technical Center and add about 2,600 jobs over the next four years.

"This is an investment in our people who work at the Tech Center because it is positioning the company for long-term growth by enabling new levels of innovation and collaboration," Mark Reuss, GM executive vice president for global product development, said Thursday in Warren. "We will transform this campus into a collaborative workplace of choice for our current team and future talent."

May 15 2015
Written by Patrick Rall | Posted on Torque News

The Dodge Challenger, Dodge Charger and a long list of other Chrysler Group vehicles that rely on the Hemi or Pentastar engines will skip their normal summer downtime in order to keep up with the high demand for these engines

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
May 14 2015
Written by Greg Gardner | Posted on Detroit Free Press

General Motors will provide details of its $419 million renovation and expansion of its Warren Tech Center Thursday morning.

Mark Reuss, GM executive vice president for global product development, Gov. Rick Snyder, Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel and Warren Mayor Jim Fouts will attend the ceremony at the Tech Center.

Last month the Warren City Council approved a 12-year tax abatement for the project that will begin later this year and be completed by the end of 2020, according to an estimated construction timeline provided to city officials.