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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs.

Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $74 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $20 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts. The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development. Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. GM and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Amgen and Google – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Nov 13 2013
Written by Larry P. Vellequette | Posted on Automotive News

Chrysler Group says it has developed a tank to store compressed natural gas that mimics human lungs and will allow the cheaper fuel source to more easily be used in automobiles.

The design uses smaller compartments inside a larger tank to increase fuel capacity and storage, similar to the alveoli within the human lung. It would free automakers from being forced to use large reinforced cylinders to store compressed natural gas onboard automobiles and would allow fuel to be stored within non-cylindrical shapes.

Nov 12 2013
Written by Michael Wayland | Posted on MLive

In honor of Veterans Day, General Motors Co. held a special ceremony with two very unique guests.

The Detroit-based automaker Thursday hosted Navajo Code Talkers Peter MacDonald, Sr., of Tuba City, Arizona and Bill Toledo, of Laguna, New Mexico, at its Technical Center in Warren for a “fireside chat.”

“We feel good about it," said MacDonald, who served in the South Pacific and North China from 1944-1946. "It’s recognition that really comes from the heart to a legacy that played a very important and significant role in World War II.”

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Nov 12 2013
Written by Jonathan Lamas | Posted on About.com

Today, here in the United States, we celebrate Veterans Day. I've always been a big believer in the Mustang's ability to bring people together. A great example of this is a group of Army veterans named "Team Mustang". They are being honored by Ford for their recent service in Afghanistan. The group, led by Lt. Col. William Phillips, chose the name "Team Mustang" as their call sign, which is used for identification during communications in the field.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Nov 08 2013
GM Media Page

Like athletes who burn fat and build muscle to become more competitive, the 2014 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 and GMC Sierra 1500 strategically replaced traditional steel with lightweight, high-strength steels for improved capability, safety and fuel efficiency.

Nov 08 2013
Chrysler

The Ram Truck brand celebrated the passion ignited around its “Year of the Farmer” initiative by presenting Clay Sapp, 2012-2013 National FFA President, with a $1 million donation at the 2013 National FFA Convention & Expo in Louisville, Kentucky, Oct. 30.

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