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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $143 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts.
The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development.
Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. General Motors and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $706 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $104 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


Feb 03 2016
Written by Ford Media Staff | Posted on Ford

Coming off strong results last January, Ford Motor Company’s total U.S. sales of 173,723 vehicles declined 3 percent last month versus a year ago.

Bright spots for January include industry-leading transaction price increases for the month, the best start since 2004 for Ford brand SUV sales and an 8-percent gain in sales for Lincoln.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Feb 02 2016
Written by John Rosevear | Posted on The Motley Fool

Production of the slow-selling sedans will end so FCA can use its assembly lines to make more Jeeps and Rams, FCA's CEO says. Here's how that's likely to play out.

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne said last week that the company will stop making the Dodge Dart and Chrysler 200 at some point in the near future in order to use the cars' factories to make more SUVs and trucks instead.

What's the story, here?

A "permanent shift" away from sedans in the U.S.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Feb 01 2016
Written by Alex Kierstein | Posted on Autoblog

It's no surprise that as SUV and truck sales remain strong in the wake of unusually cheap gas, Jeep and Ram sales are taking off. What is a surprise is that FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne thinks that cheap gas will be a "permanent condition," and feels strongly enough about it to change up North American manufacturing plans.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jan 29 2016
Written by Ford Media Staff | Posted on Ford

No actors, no stunts. Five real-world heavy-duty truck customers have an all-access insider pass to see how the all-new Super Duty – the toughest, smartest, most capable Super Duty ever – lives up to its Built Ford Tough promise.

These truck customers will witness torture testing of the all-new F-Series Super Duty before anyone else in the six-part We Own Work video series. The first video – to be posted next month at ford.com – will introduce these truck customers and provide background on their businesses and how they use their fleet of Super Duty trucks.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jan 27 2016
Written by Henry Payne | Posted on The Detroit News

Next month’s Academy Awards may be tense with questions about the diversity of actor nominees, but Hollywood’s TV spectacular will be a showcase for greater variety in the U.S. luxury automobile segment. The all-electric, American-made Tesla, not BMW or Mercedes, will be the vehicle of choice for many celebrities arriving on the red carpet.

And for the second year in a row, Cadillac will unveil a new ad for the Oscars featuring its most ambitious vehicle yet: the 2016 Cadillac CT6.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy