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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $143 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts.
The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development.
Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. General Motors and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $706 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $104 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


May 25 2016
The News Wheel

It’s easy to see that the 2017 Chrysler Pacifica is changing how we look at the minivan segment. Not only has it recruited the hilarious Jim Gaffigan to pitch it to other dads, but it offers some features that the segment has never seen before—including a hybrid powertrain, which will come later this year.
Because of its ground-breaking approach to being a family car, it shouldn’t come as any surprise that the 2017 Pacifica was recently named the Overall Best Family Car at the Greater Atlanta Automotive Media Association’s (GAAMA) 2016 Family Car Challenge.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
May 24 2016
Written by Jonathon Klein | Posted on Automobile Magazine

Not many automotive manufacturers have a history as long or as notable as Jeep’s. The first Willys-Overland rolled off the production line in the beginning of 1941 after the U.S. military turned to the auto industry for a light, tough, off-road capable vehicle to aid the Allies in World War II. Since that first offering, Jeep has endeavored to keep that trait of “go anywhere” inherent in every SUV the company builds

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
May 24 2016
Written by Forbes Nonprofit Council | Posted on Forbes

You know Ford Motor Company, the automotive giant. But what you may not be familiar with is the multibillion-dollar grant-making foundation established by its founder Henry Ford’s son in 1936. Today, the Ford Foundation gives over $500 million in grants every year and is second only to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in assets.

You can imagine the hype it created when Ford Foundation announced last year it would focus its efforts entirely on inequality.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
May 23 2016
Written by Mark Phelan | Posted on Detroit Free Press

Hidden in a General Motors presentation on how the automaker has taken hundreds of pounds out of the weight of its new vehicles is an innovation with huge implications for the automaker’s costs and conversion to new materials.

GM is about to start making parts with a technique that allows it to weld steel and aluminum together.

May 23 2016
Written by Daniel Miller | Posted on The Motley Fool

People are going crazy to get their hands on Ford Motor Co.'s new GT. After nearly 11,000 people expressed interest in buying a GT, Detroit's second-largest automaker received 6,506 completed applications from people across the planet.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy