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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $143 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts.
The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development.
Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. General Motors and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $706 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $104 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 17 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, seven out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than IBM, Qualcomm, and General Electric – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


Feb 09 2016
Written by Brent Snavely | Posted on Detroit Free Press

Jeep celebrated its rich heritage in a 60-second commercial that debuted during the Super Bowl in an ad called "Portraits," as the iconic SUV brand celebrates its 75th anniversary.

With the tagline “We don’t make Jeep, you do," the ad includes more than 60 carefully selected images from around the world, including famous celebrities such as Marilyn Monroe, Jeff Goldblum, BB King and Aretha Franklin, along with photos of historic Jeep models.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Feb 09 2016
Written by Tom Read | Posted on General Motors

As development of Chevrolet’s racing engine programs consolidate under the roof of the all-new Powertrain Performance and Racing Center, in Pontiac, Mich., it’s worth looking back at 10 engines that helped establish and sustain its winning legacy.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Feb 09 2016
Written by John Gilbert | Posted on Mustang And Fords

For Ford’s 2017 Raptor lineup there’s a Raptor model built to suit everyone’s needs. For the fuel-mileage conscious there’s the Raptor’s standard equipment Auto-Stop-Start feature where the engine kills, saving gas at a red light, and then instantly fires back up as the gas pedal is depressed for a green light.

In the Raptor’s off-road ready street trim, the truck is available in two or four door bodystyles, and for the folks enthused about venturing into off-road racing there’s the new factory prepared race-ready Raptor available as a two door only.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Feb 09 2016


AAPC Celebrates Manufacturing Day
American Automakers Continue Significant Investment in the U.S. Economy

Feb 08 2016
Written by Michael Wayland | Posted on The Detroit News

General Motors Co. introduced the new Buick Cascada to America during Super Bowl 50 with the help of two celebrities and a wedding.

The 30-second spot featured New York Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. and actress/model Emily Ratajkowski attending a wedding, where the bride and groom drove off in the two-door convertible, which is arriving in dealerships.

During the ad, Ratajkowski makes a diving catch for the bride’s bouquet of flowers, and tosses it to Beckham. Wedding attendees then talk about how she “Odell-ed it.”

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy