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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs. Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $74 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $20 billion. Raw Materials and Parts. The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials. American Research & Development. Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. GM and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Amgen and Google – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports over 7 million U.S. jobs.

Exports:

The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported over $712 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $108 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $17 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts:

The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development:

Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. FCA US, Ford and General Motors each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Apple and Hewlett-Packard– and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Market Share vs. Jobs Share vs. Parts Share


Jul 30 2015
FCA US Media

Dodge will soon be opening the dealer order banks for 2016 model year Dodge Challenger and Charger SRT Hellcats, streamlining the process and significantly increasing production to ensure that the fastest, most powerful muscle cars ever continue to move off dealer lots.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jul 28 2015
Written by Michael Wayland | Posted on The Detroit News
 
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV will more than double production of its Dodge Challenger and Charger SRT Hellcat models for the 2016 model year, officials announced on Monday.
 
The company also said it is simplifying the ordering process to make it easier for customers to purchase one of the 707-horsepower machines, which were introduced last year.
 
Both announcements follow the vehicles creating unprecedented buzz for the mainstream muscle car brand that led to months-long waiting lists and a small number of dealers engaging in irrespons
Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jul 28 2015
Written by Charles Fleming | Posted on The Detroit News
 
This isn't your Daddy's Caddy — it's a race car with Cadillac crests.
 
That's why the brand chose Willow Springs International Raceway in this city outside Los Angeles to show off its new ATS-V, a nimble sport sedan stuffed with a 464-horsepower twin-turbo V-6.
 
The company says this hot rod, starting at $61,465, targets a younger buyer and bridges the gap between the larger CTS luxury supercar and the entry-level ATS.
 
The day at Willow Springs' 2.5-mile track started early, with a light breeze riffling the flags
Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jul 28 2015
Ford
 
When driving the high-revving, 526-horsepower Shelby GT350® Mustang, drivers would do best to keep eyes on the road.
 
So that’s where Ford put the Performance Shift Light Indicator.
 
For decades, race drivers have used shift lights that signal the perfect engine speed for the shift point for maximum acceleration and lower lap times during the intensity of on-track driving.
 
Shift lights allow drivers to concentrate on the road in front of them rather than watching a tachometer.
Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jul 27 2015
FOX Sports
 
Last year, Dodge made all kinds of headlines with its 707-horsepower Dodge Challenger Hellcat.
 
Add a turbocharger and a supercharger, and those numbers have now surged to 805-horsepower on the Dodge Challenger Hellcat X - and there’s only one of them in the world.
 
To add to its exclusivity, you can’t even buy the car - in fact - the only way you can own it is by entering the Dream Giveaway charity raffle and winning it.
 
The winner will also find himself or herself the owner of a 1970-vintage Challenger R/T and $
Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy