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Manufacturing Economy

From research labs to dealership lots, the auto sector supports nearly 8 million U.S. jobs.

Exports. The auto industry is America’s largest exporter. Over the past six years, automakers and suppliers have exported nearly $600 billion worth of vehicles and parts. They beat the next best performing sector (aerospace) by $74 billion. Last year alone, automakers and suppliers out-exported the aerospace industry by $20 billion.

Raw Materials and Parts. The U.S. auto industry is one of the largest consumers of domestic raw materials and parts. Last year, automakers sold nearly 13 million cars in the U.S., and each contained between 8,000 to 12,000 parts, using more than 3,000 pounds of iron, steel, rubber, glass and semiconductors. Approximately 686,000 Americans work at the plants, offices and research labs that produce those parts and materials.

American Research & Development. Designing those 8,000 to 12,000 auto parts and helping put them together makes autos among the most engineering-intensive industries in the world. In fact, eight out of the world’s top 25 corporate investors in research and development are automakers. GM and Ford each invest more each year on research and development than Boeing, Amgen and Google – and 80 cents of every dollar they invest in research and development is spent here in the U.S. Thanks largely to this investment, nearly one in 10 engineers and scientists in private sector R&D work for an automaker or supplier.

Jul 21 2014
Written by David Skolnick | Posted on Vindy.com

After his first visit to the General Motors Lordstown complex, U.S. Sen. Rob Portman, co-chairman of the Senate Auto Caucus, called it “a really inspiring experience.”

The Republican senator said Friday that he was impressed with the Chevrolet Cruze being built at the facility and the workers.

Lordstown “is producing a world-class car in a world-class production facility,” he said about the Cruze.

Jul 18 2014
Chrysler Media

July 17, 2014 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - The throaty exhaust note of the Dodge Viper’s mighty 640-horsepower V-10 engine will be roaring around the city of Detroit this weekend, as more than 550 loyal Viper enthusiasts are heading to the home of the Viper for a special Open House at several Chrysler Group facilities, where they will be able to get a behind-the-scenes look at where and how their American exotic hand-crafted vehicles are built and then put the cars through their paces.

Filed Under: Manufacturing Economy
Jul 17 2014
Written by Mitsuru Obe | Posted on Wall Street Journal

With an ultimate goal of stimulating economic growth, hopes are high that the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade agreement will lead to a spike in cross-border business deals among member countries. Assuming that’s the case, Japan’s chief TPP negotiator posed an interesting question: why does the pact sidestep a key factor that affects practically all international business activity?

Jul 09 2014
Written by Viknesh Vijayenthiran | Posted on Christian Science Monitor

Dodge will restart production of its Viper on July 21 after a temporary shutdown was instigated at the car’s Conner Avenue Assembly Plant in Detroit to better align inventories with sales. Production had resumed briefly late last month, but Dodge has confirmed to Autoblog that full production of the Viper will only commence on the 21st of this month.

Jul 07 2014
Written by Vicki Needham | Posted on The Hill

More than a dozen leading manufacturing groups on Thursday called on the Obama administration to include currency manipulation provisions in all future trade agreements, especially the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

The 13 groups, including the American Automotive Policy Council (AAPC), sent a letter to Treasury Secretary Jack Lew and U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman, as TPP talks begin in Ottawa.

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